Vet. Services hopes for more space, resources

By Reuben Gonzales - Staff Reporter



Most students wouldn't know it by the campus website or even signs around campus that there are veteran students among them.

The Veterans Services office is located in Building 6, tucked away on the bottom floor, away from public view.

If new veteran students tried to find the information they needed online, they would need to search for it, unlike many colleges where the link it displayed on the front page.

Veterans Services was given a small space that is sectioned off by cubicle walls that offer little to no privacy.

In this space, they process all of the veterans' paperwork in order for the Veterans Administration to pay for their classes and get the student paid.

Thomas Cline has been a student at Highline since fall 2015, he is working on a second degree in medical the assistant field. He is also one of the veteran students who help veterans with their paperwork.

"As an office, we put students first and try to work for the vet," said Cline. "We try to offer a safe space for veterans to come and vent."

The issue with having thin cubicle walls is the lack of privacy. Vets are not allowed to walk-in and talk about what is wrong without worrying about how they say it, Cline said.

"We have had complaints about language and volume in the past," said Cline. "Most of the vets either have bad hearing or a lack of volume control."

The next major issue for veterans is a simple one but nonetheless frustrating, students say. The lack of space is apparent when it comes time to submit registration paperwork for the quarter. With more than 200 veteran students, this can lead to a lot of people crammed into one room.

"We get to standing room only with some vets who have disability ratings to force them to stand and wait is unacceptable," Cline said.

It's not that veterans feel excluded but more invisible, they feel forgotten, said several students. This is made evident by the office not being listed on the Building 6 directory.

"Not being recognized as a culture that is full of traditions," said Kendall Evans, Highline Veterans Service specialist.

Evans would like to see the Veterans Service office feel safe for veterans, like the USO felt when most of the vets were abroad.

"We could do so much with a space," said Evans. "We could start a veteran learning community or study groups."

The typical veteran is older and comes with a myriad of responsibilities. Some are married, have children, and bigger bills than the traditional student. Evans wants to try to go through clubs to get more for the veterans he oversees.

"It's a promise that we would take care of and help with the transition from service member to student leaders," Evans said.

"One of the greatest things about Highline is it prides itself on being inclusive," said Evans. "But not for veterans."

Presidents sign letter opposing rule change

Fifty of Washington`s col- lege presidents, including Highline`s Dr. John Mosb...


Restorative practices aims to heal wounds

As the student walks toward the front of the classroom, he knows he is in trou...


Vet. Services hopes for more space, resources

Most students wouldn't know it by the campus website or even signs around camp...

Seminar sheds light on racist origins of the West

The American west coast values it's progressive ideals, but these ideals are f...


Science includes people of every race

Highline Chemistry Pro- fessor Lauren Wugalter blew up some stuff, and also bl...


Tigers and jaguars and people, oh my!

The futures of jaguars and ti- gers are going to be determined by the people o...


Club Fair next Tuesday

If you want to join a club at Highline but have questions, visit the Club Fair next Tuesday. The fair will take place in the Mt. Constance room in Building 8. The fair will occur from 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. on Jan. 23, and will have representatives from many of the clubs on campus.

Help with Transfer Portfolio

Students who are planning on transferring to a four-year school but need help with their personal statement essay can attend a seminar on Thursday, Feb. 1. The event will take place in the MESA Center in Building 25 from 12:15-1:15 p.m. Students who want their portfolios reviewed by a representative from surrounding colleges will have that opportunity on Thursday, Feb. 8. The event will take place in the Mt. Constance room from 1:30-4 p.m. Students must register by Jan. 25. You can register in Building 6 in the Transfer Center, or online at bit.ly/tprd-wtr18.

Women's Programs giving tree brings gifts to children

The annual Women’s Program Giving Tree raised enough contributions to help 27 families, which helped give gifts to 70 children. The Women Program and WorkFirst Services Office sponsored the event in December.

Academic Success Centers open house

The Academic Success Centers is holding an open house today from 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. on floor 6 of the Library. Students will be able to inquire about AANAPISI, the Math Resource Center, MESA, Puente, the Tutoring Center, Umoja, and the Writing Center. The Academic Success Centers offers help on assignments, and has tutoring services.

Campus View will offer students a close comfort

It's more than just Christmas

Holiday events brighten your month

Lady T-Birds look for first win

FW city councilman defends appeal of excessive force

Visiting professor hopes to share language, culture

Des Moines still needs its food bank

Symphonies get in the spirit

Wrestling heads to Clackamas

Seminar sheds light on racist origins of the West

Transit station could mean more local development

Faith and intellect can add up

Ballet dances classic

Thunderbirds defeat Olympic 70-67

Science includes people of every race

Day celebrates indigenous people

The man who changed the war

Smash Bros revamp and Fallout 76 crash

Lady T-Birds start season with loss

Tigers and jaguars and people, oh my!