Study shows taht sanctuary cities aren't less safe than any other place

By Shawn Lehn - Staff Reporter



Sanctuary cities do not lead to increases in crime when compared to cities without these policies, a Highline professor said. 

President Trump's many comments on how sanctuary policies lead to increases in crime prompted a professor at Highline, Dr. Ben Gonzalez, to conduct research to see if this was actually true.

Sanctuary cities are cities or counties in the United States that limit their cooperation with federal immigration authorities by refusing most requests to detain, pursue or report undocumented people who have had contact with local law enforcement.

Dr. Gonzalez, along with his co-authors Loren Collingwood and Stephen El-Khatib from the University of California-Riverside, looked at crime rates in sanctuary and non-sanctuary cities both before and after the legislation to crack down on immigrants was passed.

They looked at crime rates between 2000 and 2014 and found no evidence that the passage of a sanctuary policy increased the crime rate in a given city when compared to non-sanctuaries.

"Trump's crack down on immigration will do nothing to solve the problem of undocumented immigration," Dr. Gonzalez said. "We need to look for a solution that includes a guest worker permit to meet labor demands, a path to citizenship for those who are here, penalties for employers who exploit undocumented workers, and border control."

Dr. Gonzalez also said, "Having people live in the shadows, scared of the police and easy targets for exploitation and victimization is not acceptable and we should strive for a commonsense solution."

Oceans taking a bad acid trip

Ocean acidification means less fish and less fish to eat, said a pair of researchers from the UW School of Oceanography.


Study shows taht sanctuary cities aren't less safe than any other place

Sanctuary cities do not lead to increases in crime when compared to cities without these policies, a Highline professor said.


No rules against drones at Highline

For the last few years, the Federal Aviation Administration has been battling with consumers on the subject of drones.

College offers free police training

Higher education deserves funding

Alumnus plans serenade

T-Birds finish the season with a win

Those body fat spot-reduction schemes and routines don't work

Learn city-living sustainability

Adoption has a dark side

Hawaiian band swings into Kent

Highline falls in the last game of the season

Where'd they all go?

International students invites you to a pool party

Fact check everything

One fat rave

Women's tennis team gears up

Spring job fair returns to Highline

Prepare for Transfer Fair next month

One human can make the difference

Ferrante brings Groucho to life

Golf team in full swing next month

Be ready for a cyber attack, prof says