One human can make the difference

By Thunderword Staff



Anyone can recycle. It's easy to do.

According to Conserve Energy Future, more than 60 percent of trash could be recycled.

People often ignore or not think about the long term effects that can happen if they don't recycle.

People might think "well, I'm only one human." According to experts one human in the United States uses 680 pounds of paper a year and most just throw it away instead of recycling it.

People need to become more aware of what they are doing to the environment. Remember that there is only one earth and this earth is shared with other people.

Recycling is one of the most effective ways to take care of the environment. Recycling saves energy and can help save fossil fuels. Most plastic bags and garbage are thrown into the ocean effecting many sea animals.

Oftentimes sea animals die of malnourishment, because the animals eat plastics and become full but don't get the actual nourishment they need because a plastic cap won't contain the nutrients they need.

Another devastating impact people have on the environment for choosing not to recycling is the amount of trees that are being wasted.

According to experts an estimated 1 billion trees worth of paper are thrown away in the United States each year.

Recycling can be a tough call when you don't know what to recycle.

Plastics bottles, jars, and jugs are recyclable. Make sure that the plastics are clean when they are put into the recycling bin.

Glass is recyclable including clear glass, brown glass, or green glass.

Aluminum cans, aluminum foil and bakeware, steel cans, and tin cans can be recycled. Aluminum is one of the most recycled item in the United States experts say.

Unfortunately, experts also say that people who don't recycle an aluminum can don't know that it can stay in that form for up to 500 years or more.

Cardboard, magazines, office paper, newspapers, paperboard, paper cardboard dairy and juice cartons, unsolicited direct mail and phone books are all item you should consider recycling. Magazines are often a confusing type of paper to know if you should recycle or not, because of the glossy texture.

According to Waste Management about 45 percent of magazines are recycled. Today you can recycle magazines.

Recycling doesn't take a lot of your time. It's just a quick decision that can be made without the pain of going out of your way.

Recycling is also a cheap way to help minimize the impact on the environment. In fact garbage collection firms will give discounts to the household that decide to recycle.

Recycling helps minimize our impact on future generations.

Can you spot the fake news?

I knew I had a problem when I posted a video of a squirrel on my Snapchat story.


Fact check everything

Social media is constantly around us and telling us what the news is.


One human can make the difference

According to Conserve Energy Future, more than 60 percent of trash could be recycled.


Editor-in-Chief - Jessica Strand

Managing Editor - Cinthia Velez-Regalado

News Editor - Kelsey Par

Arts Editor - Izzy Anderson

Sports Editor - Konner Hancock

Opinion Editor - Olivia Sullivan

Web Editor - Jonas Martin

Reporters - Keyara Brooks, Thanavin Chum, Olivia Clements, Roseline Collins, Katie Cummings, Shelly Farmer, James Jackson, Shawn Lehn, Will Otto, Wangari Muranga, Kemran Nuratdinov, Kyli Pigg, Samuel Robbins, Barinder Sandhu, Brooks Schaefer, Chentay Warnes, Lezlie Wolff, Klara Woodruff

Advertising - Angie Melnychuk

Photo Editor - Kayla Dickson

Graphics Editors - Tiffany Ho, Lucas Phang

Business Manager - Nick Asrakulov

Librarian - Huyen Nguyen

Advisers - Dr. T.M. Sell, Gene Achziger

Snow day brings mixed emotions

Police forces need diversity

Women's wear dresses up new exhibit

T-Birds let another game slip away

Study your Pacific Islander roots

Honors students told to dive into their pursuits

Can you spot the fake news?

Divas make their way to Centerstage

Highline's No. 1 scorer is back on the court

Make money with mutual funds

Latin X reaches out to familia

Fact check everything

Valentine's Day: Victim or victory

Highline misses a shot at second

Health of the Salish Sea depends on everybody

Prepare for Transfer Fair next month

One human can make the difference

Local Valentine's events spice up the weekend

T-Bird prepares to take down a title

A better listener can change the world